URETHANE

Excerpts from Bender, Arnold E. 1990. Dictionary of Nutrition and Food Technology. Butterworths, Boston.
Ethyl carbamate, NH2COOCH2H5. Used as intermediate in organic syntheses and as solubilizer. Found in small amounts in liqueurs made from stone fruits, wines and some distilled spirits where it is formed by reaction between ethanol and N compounds; cause for concern since it is genotoxic.

Webber Comment:
When I read this I think back again to my Dad who worked for a company who made sewer pipe. Dickey Clay was one of the early companies to start using the polyurethane to connect large sewer pipes. I remember Dad bring home the polyurethane to play with and figure out the conditions it would work and break down. Of course, it was such a success that some in the company [not Dad] broke off and tried it as a substitute for grass on football playing fields. Since those really early days we know how that has grown. During the early 70s I needed something simple for my pipets and he made me a polyurethane holder. I still have it!

 
Modified and compiled for the FOOD RESOURCE, Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University
Updated: Tuesday, July 3, 2012.