ALLIUM FISTULOSUM, CIBOUL, TWO-BLADED ONION, WELSH ONION

Hedrick, U.P. editor. 1919. Sturtevant's Notes on Edible Plants. Report of the New York Agricultural Experiment Station for the Year 1919 II. Albany, J.B Lyon Company, State Printers. [References Available]
is a Siberian plant, introduced into England in 1629. The Welsh onion acquired its name from the German walsch (foreign). It never forms a bulb like the common onion but has long, tapering roots and strong fibers. It is grown for its leaves which are used in salads. McIntosh says it has a small, flat, brownish-green bulb which ripens early and keeps well and is useful for pickling. It is very hardy and, as targioni-Tozzetti thinks, is proably the parent species of the onion. it is mentioned by McMahon in 1806 as one of the American garden esculents; by Randolph in Virginia before 1818; and was cataloged for sale by Thorburn in 1828, as at the present time.

 
Modified and compiled for the FOOD RESOURCE, Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University
Updated: Tuesday, July 3, 2012.